Positive Support for Children With Autism

Our mission is to provide quality and competent clinical services through individualized treatment.

Positive Support for Children with Autism is a provides Applied Behavioral Analytic support to children ages 2-16 with Autism and/or related disorders. We do this by relying on the scientific evidence of Applied Behavior Analysis, listening to the priorities of our families, respecting the voices of our children, and showing compassion for individual(s) in need of care. PSCA provides first-rate therapy in homes, schools, and communities.

WHO WE SERVE

Children and adolescents with a diagnosis of ASD or another communication disorder.

Children and adolescents ages 3-19.

3 EASY STEPS

Meet your new therapist and begin receiving services shortly thereafter.

Contact your child’s doctor (Psychiatrist or Pediatrician) for a referral.

Call us to set up an assessment or to recieve more info.

Whether you are a concerned parent, sibiling, friend, teacher, or any other support for an individual diagnosed with Autism, you know the challenges that are faced with obtaining help! Individuals with autism are often misdiagnosed and misunderstood. ABA therapy is a treatment approach using evidence-based practices centered around positive reinforcement. Basically, ABA aims to figure out what environmental factors motivate someone and manipulates that factor to achieve the desired behavior.

WHAT IS ABA?

Applied Behavior Analysis is a scientific approach for:

  • Researching the relationship between behaviors and the environment
  • Designing methods to change behavior
  • Applying these methods to improve behaviors that are important in people’s lives
  • The core concept is that the consequences of what we do affect what we learn and what we will do in the future

ABA FACTS

  • Boys are 4 1/2 times more likely to be diagnosed with Autism than girls.
  • Children born to older parents are at greater risk for Autism.
  • The earlier a child with Autism recieves treatment, the better chance of effectiveness!
  • In 2012 federal NIH budget was $30.86 billion. From this, only $169 million goes directly to autism research. That’s only 0.5% pf the total budget!!!